Wednesday, November 14, 2007

Connotations

This was a Roman shop we passed one day. I just love the way that words don't necessarily translate just as one might think: I assume that the owners were hoping to give a classy impression, but somehow a shop called "Expensive!" (or "E!" for short) doesn't really tempt me inside.

There was another shop called "Jolly Jolly Jolly" - again, this misses the sophisticated air that I imagine was intended.

I am so tired! so busy! and so sorry that I haven't been blogvisiting the last few days. And all you NaBlowhateveritis people will have been writing reams, all good stuff no doubt. I shall return.

21 comments:

  1. We miss you Isabelle but can certainly understand that life gets in the way! Hope you're at least getting to spend some quality time with the family and the catlets!

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  2. Wow, Isabelle. What an excellent adventure. . .and what insights. I read (and savored) each post.

    When you ponder what Britain was doing 2,000 years ago. . . it's even sadder to think that NOTHING was happening here in the Americas!! : )

    --Angie

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  3. I find that the Asians always miss something in translation when naming their restaurants or shops.

    They all need something fun and uplifting, to do with Feng Shui I believe, but why oh why do we always end up with things like "Yummy" or "The Happy Toasted Koala"?

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  4. "Expensive" is a classic if not classy name for a store.

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  5. I can't see myself in a store with that name. I'd be expecting to pay an entry fee.

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  6. What an odd name it seems in our understanding of the word!
    Hope you can get some sleep soon.

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  7. I've probably told you about my two favourite shop names in Brussels: "Look Sixty" (mildly retro fashion) and "100% Sweat" (a sports shop).

    Of course, "Look Sixty" might be quite effective if they were trying to attract a clientele of 80-year-olds, but somehow I don't think they were.

    I think "Jolly jolly jolly" has a certain appeal. Depends what it's selling, of course.

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  8. I'm overly daunted by clothes shops anyway so that would certainly keep me away from the door. My favourite shop name ever was a little frozen food shop on Islay called "The Wee Freeze". Still cracks me up. Anyone who is not Scottish is scratching their heads now!

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  9. Your post literally made me laugh out loud...and I needed a giggle today!

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  10. Truth in advertising?

    One wonders. Heh!

    Darla

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  11. Hilarious! I love off-the-mark translations. Aunty Evil is right, some of the best ones are to be found in Asia (or Asian restaurants, shops elsewhere). I like to steer clear of any restaurants called "Good Luck Restaurant". I am always a little suspicious that it is a sarcastic invitation to enter.

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  12. What a find, too bad you didn't venture in to see if they were right! As for the pig story, I've googled and googled, haven't found anything, bummer, sounds like quite a story.

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  13. just to make you feel accompanied on life's journey, I have 410 assessments to mark. Yes. 410. and so far have done 30.

    Those diversion tactics are just too entrenched.

    Love the shop names. There is a cafe in Croatia called "Splendid Express" which I think is a rather excellent name, though possibly not in the way intended.

    :-)

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  14. Hi Isabelle and sorry - I just tagged you for a meme!

    www.gymisntworking.blogspot.com

    I know you're busy right now - you can always save it for another day! (Ducks and runs to hide!)

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  15. I think there was a shop on Oxford Street here in London called Expensive with the same larger lowercase e. Think it might have shut a little while after it opened. Stock seemed to be cheap, rubbishly clothes.

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  16. Best shop name I saw was "Gay Jongen" (Gay Boys), was an interior design shop in Maastricht. Sold fantastically chic things.

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  17. Buying French stuff for English kids for presents, I look in vain for classy French wording on them, it seems to be considered classy here to have English on things. and some of it's really weird and nonsensical; one that tickled me was a picture on a babygrow of a bear and 'Teddy Malice' written by it!

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  18. Oh, what wonderful comments to add to my short list of bad names for shops and things. I particularly love "Look Sixty" - soon I may be only too happy to do just that - and Teddy Malice?? Oh dear!

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  19. Ha ha ha!! That is a real hoot!

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  20. Pigs would fly in Scotland before I'd enter a shop calling itself "expensive! I think I'd be much more tempted by a name like "Il Bargaino".....

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  21. There is a shop here called "Noname". Reckon they got too lazy ..... or maybe its because they have no Designer Labels?

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